Saturday, September 24, 2016

30 minutes more

Well last weeks 20 minutes went OK, some progress made and I didn't get too stressed so this week I went for 30 minutes on PMW.

This seems to be working as I got the stainless steel return pipe back in place and was able to fit it to the water pump housing too, AMAZING!  I even got the waterpump housing bolted back up and the short hose on the end of the return pipe connected to the end of the inlet manifold pipework.
From there I remembered something my mate Bruce Garbutt said to me. The water pipework through the inlet manifold on his GT6 had been blocked which restricted the flow of water. Having fixed it the car warmed up quicker but then ran cooler because this circuit was now doing what it should.

As I was at this point I decided to flush through the inlet manifold to make sure PMW's was in good shape. As can be seen from the video it certainly is fine.
At this point my 30 minutes were up so I packed everything away and closed the bonnet. Next time, 40 minutes!

I did work on another car though, my new Rover 214SEi. I have said I will not be working on this car myself but pottering about is allowed I think!

The washer jets keep stopping and the usual use of a pin down their orifice hasn't been a complete fix. This isn't a situation that's OK in a car I use as a daily commute car.

So, off with the washer bottle, disconnect the wiring and pipework to both (!) washer pumps and let cleaning begin. Well that was all very easy really, a joy to drive and a joy to work on it seems.
I ran water from the garden tap through the washer bottle and scrubbed it out with an old dish pan scrubber until it was clean.

Next the said pin was pushed down all of the washer jets front and rear followed by a blast of air from my airline gun to clear the pipework. Then reassembled everything, reconnected the wiring and pumbing followed by fresh washer fluid.

So, all well then. Err no. On first trial the pump was working for the front but there was no fluid coming out the washer jets. Not possible surely. Well yes, if you connect the rear jet's pipework to the front pump you won't get washer jets working at the front!

Swapping the tubing round though put everything back as it should be so a good job done in the end.

Saturday, September 17, 2016

Reassurance

So I returned to PMW today but promised myself I would only spend 20 minutes on it as that's all I can face.

Well I kept to that anyway.

First I removed the aircleaner so that I could reach the water pipe easier and allow me to line it up better. Well I could line it up but it wouldn't cooperate.
So next I decided to take the whole water pump and housing off the car and see if the damned thing would actually thread or if there was a problem with the threads for example.
Well with it all off the car it went in nice as pie and here's the proof.
What you see here is a stainless steel pipe and a new waterpump supplied by Chris Witor so it's not as if I am skimping on parts. PMW should be grateful I reckon!

Now I am wondering if I can put the waterpump back on and try again or maybe take all the inlet and exhaust manifold off and put this assembly back on as it is rather than risk the flippin thing being as difficult as before.

My 20 minutes were up though so on a positive note I am reasssured that the paipework will fit up and on that nore I put every thing away and I will see if I can face more than 20 minutes next week.

When this is all over I swear I won't ever work on the car again, I'll pay someone else to.

Did I mention how I am always reminded how much I love my Rover after working on Triumphs? Yes I did didn't I. Well I love my Rover so much I have bought another and that has now done over 400 miles with no problems whatsoever -are you listening Triumphs of the Raider fleet?

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Not one bit of progress

Returned to the pipe to the waterpump.

The connection showed both
  1. Spanner loose finger tight
  2. Will not begin to thread
So I disconnected the pipe at the other end where the inlet manifold has a dodgy broken bit (gulp) to see if that would help me manipulate it and line it up so meaning I could tread it then. NO! 
 
After half an hour I stopped as big spanners would have been thrown around if I continued.

Next I think I will take the inlet manifold off completely so I can move the pipe around and have more chance of getting it lined up perfectly so that the little darling might then start to thread - what a happy day that will be.

I'll worry about other connections after that and of course ultimately whether the waterpump has helped with the overheating.

Oh, and if you remember dear reader I said last week how all this makes me remember how much I love my Rover 214i. No change this week!

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Walk away

My 2000 is running too warm for my liking - at 3/4 on the temp gauge with the electric fan on all the time.

So I decided to swap the waterpump as it has a new radiator as well as thermostat.

Here's dismantling underway which was fairly straight forward. Hoses undone, bolts coming out etc.
Then before you know it the pump is off the car and swapped for a new one.




Replacement is a simple reversal of the removal. Well it's not actually, or at least not in this case. Getting the bolts and brackets etc back in the right sequence was a bit of a trial taking two or three attempts.

Then when all that was done I realised the pipe taking water to the inlet manifold under the carbs wasn't attached. The pump had to comeoff again to get it in place and then no matter how I tried I couldn't get the nut that holds it on to thread - see below.
Oh, and I managed to lose my favourite screw driver out of a set I have had for years. Now that's impossible but for now that's just how it is.

Meanwhile the gasket between pump and head tore a little bit and I am hoping I can get away with it. I should have remembered to order this gasket as well but I am where I am.

It was at that point I decided to walk away. We will see what next week brings.

I do have to say that the more I work on Triumphs the more I love my Rover!

Saturday, July 30, 2016

2000 home & UNJ dizzy!

My 2000 is now back home from the garage with diff fitted and an MOT - hurragh!

It does run rather warmer than I would like though so I have only driven it 2 miles during which it seemed smooth and the diff much quieter. There was still some noise which I would consider likely to be from the transmission somewhere - surely not a reconditioned gearbox at some point?

Regarding the hot running though, I did not replace the water pump when I rebuilt the engine and given that it has had a new radiator, a good flush through more than once as well as a new thermostat I have now ordered a new water pump. When that arrives we will see if that helps. It certainly can't do any harm.

Meanwhile, here's a pic of PMW back home with friend in passenger seat.
Today though I have been working on UNJ as it has started running very roughly with alot of hesitation and even struggling to run at all. Now I always think problems are on the ignition side so straight under the bonnet for a good poke around!
I worked on tidying a few bits and pieces up at the same time. The car is losing some coolant from somewhere and there is a small amount of coolant resting on the block in a recess below one of the hoses where it goes onto a transfer pipe. By removing the air filter I could get at it better and I got the hose onto the pipe further and retightened it.

I get the feeling a new pipe wouldn't go amiss though.

Meanwhile, the poor running. Well at one point I had the car running and the air scoop (not visible in the picture) became dislodged, fell against the distributor cap and the car stopped dead. A big clue there! The distributor cap itself felt loose which is not a good thing at all so I removed it for inspection.

Looking inside it must have been moving about as there are marks on the inside of the cap where I reckon the rotor arm has been hitting the side. Not good at all.
I did clean it out but when refitting couldn't really get a good fit when re clipping it. So I found a second hand one, fitted that and fired up the TR7!

After putting everything back I took the car for an 18 mile test run and it is much improved. Now that's a good thing as I plan to use it for next weekend's Club Triumph Border Raiders Run which will be a good 300 miles over 2 days.

I think a new dizzy cap and a rotor arm wouldn't be a bad idea either.

Saturday, July 23, 2016

Of TR7s

First appearance on here for BRP in many a long time. Whilst working on UNJ I took the cover off BRP to at least give it an airing.
Earlier in the day though I had driven over in UNJ to S&S Preperations in Bacup to get a new radiator cap (on advice it's possible that the previous one is allowing water to be released under pressure) and also get hold of some fitments for the hood cover.
So I spent a fair bit of time this afternoon replacing any of the studs and fixings that were missing or broken and have to say it was very satisfying.


Astonishingly whilst at S&S we solved the troublesome windscreen washers too! An after market filter was doing such a good job at filtering gunk that it blocked and no water was reaching the washer jets. Removal of said filter and then some adjustments at the end of the day mean it looks like the car has reliable powerful washer jets now as well.

And with that level of progress definitely time to call it a day :-)

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Putting off the inevitable

Ever since I have had the TR7 convertible UNJ it has been cosmetically challenged but relatively solid. I have poured money into the 2000 but  spent little in comparison on UNJ.

Well the bodywork is becoming worse as could be expected. I am also not in a position to pay for a full professional restoration right now so it's a case of putting off the inevitable day when serious money has to be spent.

The sills of the car are getting "scabby" but still pretty much solid so before things get worse action was needed. First anything flaking off was removed with a scraper, then the sills wire brushed which helped "key" the surface which was a grey stone chip.

After this masking using tape and newspaper with a bag to cover the whell&tyre.

Finally an entire can of black paint was sprayed on both sides. The previous colour of the stone chip material was grey but I actually did some research and from my original sales brochure I found that the correct colour was shiny black.

So that's what I used and the effect is pretty good. Not only that but it helps preserve the car for a little longer.